My Path

This is a snapshot of the path I’ve traveled along my
Spiritual journey, it is not a comprehensive history.

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The Journey Begins

     My mother; world renowned Astrologer, Delores O’Bryant, was raised in a Christian Church.  She didn’t attend Church when my siblings and I were children and did not take us.  Nonetheless, she was a very Spiritual person.
     Around the time I was five, my mother’s oldest sister insisted that I and my siblings go to Church.  My mother agreed that my aunt could take us.  So, we began to attend Church.
     A short while after that, a family friend started a Church.  It was a Seventh Day Adventist Church and service was held on Saturdays.  Subsequently, we were now attending Church services on Saturdays and Sundays.  The Pentecostal Church of Christ on Sundays, and the Seventh Day Adventist Apostolic Pentecostal Church of Christ on Saturdays.
     My mother didn’t make us attend Church.  Her position was that we could continue going as long as we wanted.  Her focus was to teach us to think for ourselves and she was always supportive of our ideas for learning.  I recall always having an abundance of books in the house; among them, at least 3 sets of encyclopedias.
     I have always been extremely curious.  So, I always had a lot of questions for the Ministers and Sunday School teachers at the Churches I attended.  The problem was that they never answered my questions to my satisfaction.  Sometimes I felt as if they were blowing me off because I was a child, and other times I felt that they just didn’t know the answers.  It seemed to me that they just wanted me to accept whatever I was told whether it made sense to me or not.
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Rebelling Against the Status Quo

     Around the age of 12, I decided that these experiences were not satisfactory for me.  With my mother’s support, I stopped attending the Churches.  Always supportive and encouraging, at my request she bought me a set of books describing the origins, foundations and beliefs of seven major world religions: Christianity (divided into Catholicism and Protestantism), Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism and Confucianism.
     I read all of those books and to enhance my education about these matters, I visited all kinds of different Churches, Temples, Mosques, Synagogues, and Spiritual Sanctuaries.  Everywhere I went, I asked a lot of questions, but it always seemed that the best answers came from books about the various religions.  The next best answers came from the study of each religion’s individual bibles when read with an open mind and in reference to the academic literature.
     The general conclusion I reached after some years of my personal quest to find the answers I was looking for, was that every religion had pretty much the same basis.  There are some basic ideas, beliefs and understandings that all religions believe and teach.  These ideas, beliefs and understandings I call, “A fine line of Truth.”  Another commonality amongst all religions is that the wise men, mystics, prophets, sages and avatars whose lives and teachings the religions are based on, never set out to found a religion.  They merely tried to improve the world by living and teaching from the understanding they attained.  The followers of these individuals started the religions, usually long after theses great teachers had transcended this life experience.
     I also concluded that for the most part, it is because of the misunderstanding of the followers of the various teachings, and their misinterpretations of what was originally taught, that the teachings always appear to be so different.  There is not that much difference in what Jesus, Mohamed, Vishnu, Buddha or Moses came to teach.  In fact, they all made an effort to unite the world.  It is the misunderstanding of their teachings that causes the world to be so insidiously divided due to religious differences.  As a result of my findings, I decided that I was of no religious preference, but somehow accepting of all religions in general.  My religion was personal to me.  It was very private and was defined as, “That fine line of Truth.”
     All of the intellectual understanding I derived from this inquisitive pursuit however, did not prove to make any extremely poignant changes in my life.  In the course of my quest for these answers, I found that the practice prevalent in Eastern religions of meditation is what precipitated the beginnings of a personal metamorphisis.  The ability to “go within” ones self and tap into a sense of inner peace, proved to be a very powerful method of connecting to something greater than anything I could learn anywhere, in any book or from any teacher.
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Right in My Own Back Yard

     Interestingly, although my mother was on a similar path, she and I did not talk to each other much about these ideas for many years.  But as the years passed, she became one of my most significant spiritual teachers.  While we did not often talk to each other about these ideas for some time, I would borrow many of her books.  Influenced by a different set of circumstances, she became an ardent student of metaphysics and developed into an internationally renowned astrologer.  She later founded an independent Religious Science Church.
     She owned a metaphysical bookstore, and after we finally connected in the understanding that our spiritual paths were running along parallel tracks, I actually took one of the classes she taught.  I became a student in her astrology class.  I never completed the first year; she was a tough teacher and I was a bit too laid back to be one of her promising students.  I later sat in on a series of classes she taught on a subject she called, “Thought Law.”
     These classes were based on lessons from a text book called “The Science of Mind,” which was written by Ernest Holmes, the founder of the New Thought religion called Religious Science.  I never formally registered for these classes, but I did acquire my first copy of the Science of Mind text as a gift from my mother at that time.
     Theses classes lead to the founding of her Church; “The Uranian Church of Spiritual Philosphies.”  I belonged to her Church in the early years, and even became an Ordained Minister.  However, I didn’t stay there long.  I later became a member of another Church; “The Universal Temple of Spiritual Light,” which was founded by Yogini E. Linda Naylor and has a foundation based on Yoga teachings.  I was compelled to attend this Church because meditation sessions were held during the week and were also a component of the worship service.  I continued my self studies of all things Spiritual and metaphysical, reading as much as I could of anything I could get my hands on.  But since the first day I received my copy of the Science of Mind text, it has always the one book I depend on.  I was a self study student of that book until a little more than eight years ago.
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30 Years of Searching

     The writings of Ernest Holmes have always fascinated me.  He came to the same conclusions that I did, but was able to understand and explain his ideas more thoroughly.  In fact, he did the same research I did, but much more intensely.  The most important thing however, was that not only was he able to effectively answer the questions I have always pondered, he answered them completely, and detailed how this understanding could actually be applied to everyday life by anyone, anywhere, at any time.  The Science of Mind text to me is the most comprehensive and useful book ever written about Spiritual matters.
     I have not been a self study student of the Science of Mind text, or of Spiritual ideas and philosophies in general since September 2000.  I have been taking classes accredited by The International Centers for Spiritual Living (formerly Religious Science International) since then.  I had not benefited from these ideas as meaningfully as I do now before I began taking these classes.  All in all, this journey has spanned 38 years of my life, but the last eight have wrought the most significant and meaningful changes in my life.
     Learning to apply wisdom is tremendously more powerful and life enhancing than any other acquisition of knowledge that can be pursued.  That is what I’ve experienced since September 2000, and what I intend to share through the avenue of this site.
     Thanks for stopping by. Don’t be a stranger.

Blessings of Love, Peace, Joy, Health and Abundance,
Guy

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